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Want more respect?

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on October 18, 2008

Overcoming stress is one positive step towards heart health and weight loss. Here’s a guest post from Doris Helge, Ph.D. She provides a simple technique for gaining more respect so you can get your needs met and enjoy your life much more. Turn anger, fear, and other negative emotions into peace and confidence.

Want more respect?
by Doris Helge, Ph.D.

Even though Jan and Nan are both very talented, Jan’s contributions are applauded while Nan’s gifts are unnoticed. What’s Jan’s secret? Jan has discovered that we are constantly training other people how to treat us. When Jan is treated with disrespect, she politely says, “No thank you” by using the technique in this article. Even though Jan knows we can’t change other people, she knows how to set up situations in which she’s treated well and her needs are met.

The following is an example of how you can gain peace of mind when someone else’s behavior rubs you the wrong way. My coaching clients call it The Get Respect Now Technique.

DON’T BE AN OSTRICH

Nan tries to ignore her problems like an ostrich that hides its head in the sand. Then Nan moans that life presents her with the same snarly packages over and over. Jan’s approach is very different. She meets a challenge with, “Hmmm . . . I wonder what I’ll learn from this experience?” Denying an unpleasant situation breeds more of the same. The challenge magnifies until we finally say, “Alright, already . . . I’ll deal with this.” Avoid getting hit over the head by a 2×4 by standing up for yourself when a toothpick jabs you. Perceive situations as accurately as possible. A rope is a rope and a snake is a snake. The simple act of acknowledging what exists initiates the potential for positive change. Why? You signal your mind to search for solutions.

AIM FOR RESULTS INSTEAD OF TRYING TO BE “RIGHT.”

When you’ve been treated with disrespect, pause a moment and ponder. How can you express what you’re entitled to in a factual way? The other person may never acknowledge that you’re right because all of us have erroneous perceptions. They’ve been formed by decades of experiences and faulty beliefs.

Do you ever watch a “sunset” even though the sun never sets? Do you ever instantly like or dislike a person you’ve never met? When treated with disregard, your goal is to be heard and get your needs met. We can’t force other adults to change their opinions or behavior. However, we are in total control of how we respond to every situation. We can say what we need to and transform anxiety into peace of mind.

EXAMPLES

Here’s an example you might use at work. “I felt hurt when his contributions were recognized and mine weren’t noticed. I need for my work to be acknowledged.” An example at home is, “When you didn’t call and tell me you changed your plans, I worried about you. I need to know when you’ll be late so I can arrange my own schedule.” Notice: These statements are not drenched with negative emotions or accusations that trigger defensiveness and counter attacks. You gain positive results faster by using “I statements” that acknowledge your emotions. Use the minimum amount of words possible to say what you need. Know you deserve it. This approach will empower you to breathe a big sigh of relief and go on with your next step in life.

THE FINAL OUTCOME

No matter what the final outcome of the particular situation, you’ll meet your personal growth challenge, so this type of situation will occur less frequently. Just use the technique I’ve outlined so you can easily resolve conflicts with “difficult people.” Soon, an effective response to disrespectful behavior will become easy and automatic because you’ll be clear what you deserve. Enjoy knowing you are so powerful that you can infinitely reshape your life. You deserve happiness. Turn every unpleasant experience into a rich opportunity for personal growth.

Visit http://www.FreeJoyOnTheJobEbooks.com and GET YOUR FREE EBOOKS: “Secrets of Happiness at Work,” “Employee Engagement Made Easy,” and “Get the Respect & Appreciation You Deserve Now.” Doris Helge, Ph.D., is 100% dedicated to empowering you to create more meaning, fun, and fulfillment at work. Dr. Doris is an executive coach & a corporate trainer for companies as large as Microsoft. Download sample chapters from Dr. Helge’s latest books, “Joy on the Job” & “Transforming Pain Into Power” at http://www.MoreJoyOnTheJob.com.

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Trans Fats Banned in California

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on October 13, 2008

Good news if you live in California! Starting in 2010 restaurants will be banned from using trans fats in food preparation. This will be a major benefit to those of you struggling to lower total cholesterol, low LDL “bad” cholesterol, or raise HDL “good” cholesterol. To improve your lipid profile you should follow a diet with less than 30% daily calories from fat. Ideally your intake of trans fatty acids should be zero for heart health. Since numerous restaurants affected will be nationwide chains, hopefully the trend will start to spread and avoiding trans fats when dining out will not be an issue after a few more years.

All the best,
Lisa Nelson, RD, LN
eNutritionServices

Posted in food, heart health, lower cholesterol, nutrition | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Heart Healthy Lettuce – Reach for the dark, leafy greens

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on October 6, 2008

Are you a die hard fan of ice berg lettuce? Iceberg lettuce is a source of vitamins A, C, K, and B6; along with some fiber, potassium, and folate. This probably sounds great, but compared to romaine lettuce, iceberg falls short nutritionally.

Romaine lettuce has 7 times more vitamin A than iceberg lettuce and about twice the amount of calcium and potassium. Also, dark leafy greens contain the antioxidant beta carotene. Antioxidants help protect against inflammatory disorders, such as heart disease.

So, next time you make a salad, by-pass the iceberg and reach for the leafy romaine.

Be sure to sign-up for The Heart of Health and grab your special report “Stop Wasting Money – Take Control of Your Health”!

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Your Checklist to Lower Cholesterol

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on September 12, 2008

Here’s a checklist of the top 8 things you must do if you want to successfully lower your cholesterol and keep it low.

Know your numbers

Have you had a lipid profile? Do you understand the numbers? If you are going to successfully lower cholesterol you need to know your numbers and what they mean. The most effective way to raise HDL is not necessarily the best way to lower LDL.

Evaluate your lifestyle

There are risk factors for high cholesterol that you can not control, such as age, gender, and family history, but there are factors you can control. For example, you can reduce risk by not smoking, increasing your activity, and losing extra weight.

Balance your fats

Reduce unhealthy saturated fats in your diet and replace them with heart healthy unsaturated fats. Total fat intake should be 30% or less of your total daily calories. Out of this 30%, saturated fat should be limited to 7%.

Be active

Physical activity lowers triglycerides and raises HDL (good) cholesterol. Shoot for 30 minutes 5 or more days a week. If you are not currently active, check with your MD before beginning an activity program.

Eliminate trans fats

You need to be food label savvy and watch out for trans fats. Trans fats raise LDL (bad) cholesterol, lower HDL (good) cholesterol, and raise triglycerides. Limit trans fats to 1% or less of your daily caloric intake.

Understand triglycerides

Triglycerides are impacted the most by your simple sugar and alcohol intake. If you are struggling with high triglycerides, you need to use a different strategy to get your cholesterol under control.

Increase dietary fiber

A high fiber diet is necessary for heart health. You need 25-35 grams of dietary fiber daily, especially soluble fiber. For every 1-2 grams of daily soluble fiber intake, LDL (bad) cholesterol is lowered 1%.

Add omega 3 fatty acids

For heart health and lower cholesterol, you want to improve the ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 fatty acids. Omega 3 fatty acids are involved in the regulation of heart rate, blood pressure, and blood clotting.

If you’re ready for regular heart health and weight loss tips for dietitian Lisa Nelson, sign up for The Heart of Health today and grab your copy of the special report “Stop Wasting Money – Take Control of Your Health” today!

Posted in heart health, lower cholesterol | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Preserve potassium when preparing potatoes

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on September 5, 2008

If you’re making mashed potatoes or many other potato dishes, what do you do?  Cube the potatoes and throw them in a pot of water to boil?  If you want to hang on to the potassium potatoes offer, it’s best to boil the potato whole – skin and all.  When potatoes are cubed or shredded then boiled, studies show a 75% loss of potassium.

Also, good news if you like to soak your potatoes in water overnight.  Soaking potatoes does not result in a significant loss of nutrients to the water they’re soaked in.

For regular heart health and weight loss tips from dietitian Lisa Nelson, be sure to sign up for The Heart of Health ezine.

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Omega 3’s and Walnuts

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on September 1, 2008

Sometimes people wonder about the health benefits of the black walnut versus the more common English walnut, so I’m going to provide you some quick info. 

The English walnut contains more omega 3 fatty acids per ounce than the black walnut (2.6 grams versus .57 grams).  To promote heart health, increasing your omega 3 fatty intake is a good step to take, so opt for the English walnut (which is easier to find anyway).  

Another component to keep in mind:

The type of omega 3 fatty acid contained in walnuts is ALA (alpha linolenic acid).  The conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA (the two types of omega 3 fatty acids linked to health benefits) is inefficient. 

The Heart of Health

Be sure to sign up for The Heart of Health to receive regular heart health and weight loss tips from dietitian Lisa Nelson!

Posted in heart health, lower cholesterol | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Omega 3’s and Walnuts

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on September 1, 2008

Sometimes people wonder about the health benefits of the black walnut versus the more common English walnut, so I’m going to provide you some quick info. 

The English walnut contains more omega 3 fatty acids per ounce than the black walnut (2.6 grams versus .57 grams).  To promote heart health, increasing your omega 3 fatty intake is a good step to take, so opt for the English walnut (which is easier to find anyway).  

Another component to keep in mind:

The type of omega 3 fatty acid contained in walnuts is ALA (alpha linolenic acid).  The conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA (the two types of omega 3 fatty acids linked to health benefits) is inefficient. 

The Heart of Health

Be sure to sign up for The Heart of Health to receive regular heart health and weight loss tips from dietitian Lisa Nelson!

Posted in heart health, lower cholesterol, nutrition | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Wear a pedometer for heart health and weight loss!

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on August 29, 2008

Wearing a pedometer is a simple way to track your activity.  

First, wear a pedometer everyday for a week and write your daily steps on a calendar.  By the weeks end, you’ll have a idea of how much you move each day. 

Next, find ways to increase your steps, such as an extra walk, taking the stairs versus the elevator, parking further from the store, etc.  

Make your final goal 10,000 steps (~5 miles) each day!

Lisa Nelson, RD, LN
The Heart of Health

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Brown rice – New whole grain health claim.

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on August 26, 2008

I’ve always recommended clients make a switch from white rice to brown rice as a way to boost dietary fiber intake.  A diet high in dietary fiber (ideally 25-35 grams/day) is linked with reduced heart disease risk by lowering LDL and total cholesterol levels.

The FDA just approved a new ruling that will allow brown rice to use a health claim on its label.  So, when you’re shopping for groceries, be on the look out for the new whole-grain logo added to the brown rice packaging and don’t forget to reach for the brown rice over the white!  A 1/2 cup of cooked  brown rice contains two grams of fiber.

Brown rice takes extra time to prepare (~45 minutes).  I checked out the nutrition label on brown “minute” rice recently and it’s another option, still providing 2 grams of dietary fiber per 1/2 cup serving.  Best of all, only takes ~10 minutes to prepare.  Haven’t tried it yet, so can’t vouch for its flavor, but I have added it to my shopping list.

All the best,

Lisa Nelson, RD, LN
The Heart of Health

Posted in food, heart health, lower cholesterol | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Control High Blood Pressure – Switch from canned veggies to frozen.

Posted by Lisa Nelson, RD, LN on August 19, 2008

Canned vegetables are high in sodium, while frozen vegetables (without added sauces) usually have no added sodium. Buy the large economy size bags, pour out the amount you need for your meal, close the bag with zip closure or twist tie and stick back in the freezer until next time!

Making this change will significantly reduce your sodium intake, promote blood pressure control and heart health!

Be sure to sign up for regular heart health and weight loss tips through The Heart of Health ezine!

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